23 Healthy Kombucha Recipes to Heal Your Gut

kombucha recipes

We love kombucha so much at Annmarie Skin Care HQ that we have a keg on tap. That’s why we were so excited to share this article from our friends at PaleoHacks!

Fizzle up with these gut-healing kombucha recipes filled with nourishing probiotics!

Fermented foods like yogurts, sauerkraut, and kimchi all offer your gut the mega-benefit of probiotics, but there’s one fermented elixir that tops our list: kombucha.

This fizzy drink is typically made by fermenting tea with a sweetener and a SCOBY, or a symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast. If you’ve never made a batch from scratch before, we’ve got the best kombucha guide to help get you started.

Paleo-friendly kombucha?

Kombucha tastes best when you make it at home with Paleo-friendly ingredients – it’s also much more cost-effective than buying bottles of it at the store. The best part? You can flavor kombucha with a variety of fresh fruit, spices, flowers, teas, and roots.

From strawberry to hibiscus to pumpkin spice, and more, you’ll find plenty of sweet-drink kombucha recipes to shake up your daily water routine. You can even experiment with flavors to create your own gut-healing kombucha gummies.

To flavor your kombucha, you’ll need to send it through a second fermentation process. Adding too many extra ingredients during the first stage of fermentation may damage the SCOBY or have other adverse effects on your brew. So, brew up a big batch of that fermented tea and try these flavored kombucha recipes to liven up your drink.

Paleo Kombucha

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This simple, straightforward kombucha recipe combines green and black tea flavors in its brew.

Recipe: PaleoHacks | Paleo Kombucha

Strawberry Kombucha

Strawberries make for one deliciously sweet and refreshing drink.

Recipe: Cultures for Health | Strawberry Kombucha

Citrus Rosemary Kombucha

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Start with your favorite basic kombucha, then add in freshly squeezed ruby red grapefruit, lemon and fresh rosemary in this zingy recipe.

Recipe: The Wild Gut | Citrus Rosemary Kombucha

Spiced Apple Kombucha

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The perfect fizzy sipper for fall, this recipe adds apples, spices, and fresh ginger to kombucha.

Recipe: Intoxicated on Life | Spiced Apple Kombucha

Clean Green Kombucha

For a super healthy elixir, that your body will thank you for, add powdered greens and lemon to your kombucha.

Recipe: Cultures for Health | Clean Green Kombucha

Cranberry Spice Kombucha

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Cranberries, cloves, cinnamon, and ginger capture fall flavors in this warm recipe.

Recipe: The Wild Gut | Cranberry Spice Kombucha

Watermelon-Cucumber Kombucha Coolers

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Fresh watermelon juice and fresh cucumbers sweeten up this batch of ’booch. Skip the optional ingredients to keep it fit and healthy.

Recipe: Feed Me Phoebe | Watermelon-Cucumber Kombucha Coolers

Chocolate Raspberry Kombucha

Chocolate-y kombucha? Yes, we’re serious. Opt for a Paleo-friendly raspberry jam in this recipe.

Recipe: Cultures for Health | Chocolate Raspberry Kombucha

Strawberry Cucumber Kombucha

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Check out this strawberry cucumber combo for a brisk refresher you can’t resist.

Recipe: South Beach Primal | Strawberry Kombucha

Citrus Kombucha

Try orange, grapefruit or a blend of the two for an ultra-citrusy fermented drink.

Recipe: Cultures for Health | Citrus Kombucha

Hibiscus Kombucha

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This hibiscus-flavored kombucha makes for one pretty shade of reddish pink.

Recipe: Wholeheart Nutrition | Hibiscus Kombucha

Chia Seed Kombucha

In this thick and jammy recipe, simply add chia seeds to your kombucha for a fun twist.

Recipe: Cultures for Health | Chia Seed Kombucha

Pumpkin Spice Kombucha

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Yes, you can even add pumpkin purée to your kombucha for epically flavorful results.

Recipe: The Wild Gut | Pumpkin Spice Kombucha

Apple Pie Kombucha

This set of recipes give you not one, but three ways to flavor your kombucha with deliciously spiced apple flavor.

Recipe: Hybrid Rasta Mama | Apple Pie Kombucha

Cream Soda Kombucha

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Be sure to use organic, pure blackstrap molasses (no added sugar) to keep this recipe Paleo.

Recipe: Essential Omnivore | Cream Soda Kombucha

Pomegranate Orange Kombucha

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This holiday-approved kombucha is made with a zesty combination of pomegranate and orange juices, with a twist of fragrant orange peel for garnish.

Recipe: Stupid Easy Paleo | Pomegranate Orange Kombucha

Pineapple and Cayenne Kombucha

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This spicy and tropical take on kombucha will make your taste buds tingle – in a good way.

Recipe: The Wild Gut | Pineapple and Cayenne Kombucha

Ginger Turmeric Kombucha

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Not only are you getting all the probiotic benefits of kombucha in this drink, but the anti-inflammatory effects of ginger and turmeric root, too!

Recipe: All The Nourishing Things | Ginger Turmeric Kombucha

Kombucha Lemonade

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In the mood for a summertime zingy drink? Opt for this fizzy lemon drink to unwind in the sun.

Recipe: Fit Foodie Finds | Kombucha Lemonade

Raspberry Lime Homemade Kombucha

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Fresh lime and raspberries combine in this citrusy tart drink.

Recipe: Paleo Running Momma | Raspberry Lime Homemade Kombucha

Peach Kombucha

You’ve had peach iced tea, now imagine adding an addicting fizzy tang to it.

Recipe: Thank Your Body | Peach Kombucha

Pineapple Strawberry Kombucha

Homemade-Fruit-Flavored-Kombucha.jpgBlended strawberry and pineapple make for one sweet addition to kombucha.

Recipe: Isabel Eats | Pineapple Strawberry Kombucha

Homemade Elderberry Kombucha

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A true tropical treat, this recipe adds lavender, honey, and ginger to a kombucha drink you’re sure to love.

Recipe: Naturally Loriel | Homemade Elderberry Kombucha

 

What are some of your favorite kombucha recipes? Share with us in the comments!

 

The following post 23 Healthy Kombucha Recipes to Heal Your Gut was first published on Annmarie Skin Care.

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3 Unexpected Uses for the Beauty Blend Tea

Beauty Blend

The Beauty Blend Tea is pretty much the perfect compliment to our line. Chances are, you’re using our skin care in some sort of self care practice, right? Nothing goes better with a face mask and a bath than a perfect cup of tea. Beauty Blend is an intensely nourishing mix, which means that you’re taking care of yourself on the inside, too.

The blend consists  hand-selected yerba mate, nettle, and horsetail. They can all stimulate and support a healthy glow from within due to their rich quantities of antioxidants, phytonutrients, and bioflavonoids.

Think outside the Mug

With ingredients this powerful, it’s no surprise that this tea is good for more than just, well, tea. We find ourself using the beauty blend outside the mug often—here are our three favorite ways to get creative with it!

Unexpected Uses for Tea

1. DIY Facial Steam

Treat yourself to an at-home facial by creating a DIY facial steam with the beauty blend. Simply boil a few cups of water and pour over two tablespoons of the tea blend. Feel free to add essential oils to this mix as desired.

Place a bath towel over the back of your head, and hold a few feet above the steam for about 10 minutes. This treatment will help detox your skin and leave you feeling refreshed and renewed.

Taking deep breaths of the herbal steam is great for your sinuses as well!

3 Unexpected Uses for Tea

2. Cocktail Mixer

Yes, yes, we love the Beauty Blend for it’s nourishing properties, but you can have some fun with it too. Try our version of a Long Island Iced Tea!

Ingredients

2 tablespoons Beauty Blend
2 cups water
¼ cup rum
¼ cup vodka
¼ cup tequila
¼ cup triple sec
¼ cup agave nectar
1 lemon, juiced
2 lemons for serving

Directions

The night before your Long Island tea party, steep two tablespoons of the Beauty Blend in two cups of boiling water for 20 minutes. Refrigerate overnight so your tea is cold when getting your mix on. The next day, combine tea, alcohol, agave, and lemon juice into a large pitcher. Add lemon slices for serving, and voila!

3 Unexpected Uses for Tea

3. Hair Rinse

The herbs in the Beauty Blend aren’t just nourishing for your insides. So many of these ingredients have incredible effects on your hair as well!

Take nettle for example— it strengthens and can help with dandruff. Ingredients such as Sea Buckthorn are rich in antioxidants that naturally soften and promote shiny tresses.

Yerba Mate contains caffeine that increasing blood flow when it penetrate hair strands, encouraging your luxurious locks to grow their strongest.

Do It Yourself!

Steep two tablespoons of Beauty Blend in two cups of water, give or take. Pour over your hair after shampooing and leave on for 5 minutes. Follow up with a deep conditioning for a glorious shine!

3 Unexpected Uses for Tea

Bonus: Get in the garden and make your plants grow!

Finished with your tea? Not so fast! Instead of throwing out your used tea blend, take it to your garden and let it work its magic on your plant babies.

City dwellers, this is for you too- you can use this method on your beloved house plants. Spread your tea remains around the base of the plants, like a mulch. Your plants will love it and absorb the nutrients, just like you did.

Do you have any alternative uses for tea? Share with us in the comments!

 

The following post 3 Unexpected Uses for the Beauty Blend Tea was first published on Annmarie Skin Care.

Sensitive Skin: What It Is, How to Cope, and the Best Products for You

sensitive skin

We’ve been talking about skin types here the last few weeks—dry, oily, and combination. But this week, we’re talking about a type that can co-exist with any of these. In other words, you can have combination skin, and also have sensitive skin. Dry skin types are the ones who are most often plagued with sensitivity as well, but combinations may have it too. It’s more rare in oily skin.

In the world of skin care, being “sensitive” doesn’t mean that you’re feelings are easily hurt. Instead, it means that your skin can be easily affected, and has a definite set of characteristics that require special care.

If you think you may fall in the sensitive realm, read on.

What is Sensitive Skin?

Sensitive skin is easily “bothered” by things. Sun exposure, wind, heat and cold, chemicals in products, and other similar factors can all cause this skin type to react. The type of reaction may vary, but the key point is that the skin is often reacting to something.

What Causes Sensitive Skin?

There are a number of possible causes. You may have been born with sensitive skin. Maybe your mom or dad had it, or one of your grandparents. Either way, it’s been that way since you can remember, and you’re stuck.

There are other things, however, that can actually cause your skin to become more sensitive. These include:

Allergies—if you are allergic to certain things, your skin may react sensitively to them

Dry skin—dry skin types are often sensitive as well, because of the thinner outer layer

Excessive exposure to environmental factors, such as the sun, wind, or harsh chemical irritants

If you have any of the above skin conditions, you qualify as a sensitive skin type.

skin care concern

Specific Problems in Sensitive Skin Types

Sensitive skins usually notice these types of problems:

•     Occasional redness
•     Sunburns and windburns easily
•     Occasional blotchiness
•     Dryness
•     Oily skin
•     Clogged pores
•     Tight skin

Most Sensitive Skins Have Triggers

If you have sensitive skin, you may already know some of the “triggers” that create reactions on your skin. There are some common, ones, however, that you may not be aware of. Some well known triggers that can make sensitive skin react include:

•     Temperature changes
•     Chemical and/or synthetic fragrances
•     Formaldehyde
(and formaldehyde releasing preservatives like urea, quaternium-15, and DMDM hydantoin)
•     Dyes
•     Cosmetics and soaps
•     Preservatives
•     Propylene glycol and ethanol
•     Fragrances (the #1 allergen and irritant in cosmetics)
•     Bismuth oxychloride and mica (light-refracting ingredients found in makeup)
•     Hormonal imbalances
•     Lanolin
•     Rubber latex
•     4-tert-butylphenol in cosmetics (lip liners), plastics, and lacquers
•     Chemicals used in pesticides and herbicides
•     Menthol and peppermint
•     Gold and silver metals

Some people who have allergies to natural trees and grasses, such as ragweed, can also develop allergies to essential oils like chamomile and calendula, since these are cross-reactive ragweed allergens.

check your labels!

Others can gradually become sensitized to certain skin care products that have formaldehyde, particularly after using them for awhile. This is why it’s important to always be careful about the ingredients in your product, as some harsh chemicals and preservatives can sometimes create skin sensitivity over time as you use them.

“Women are using more anti-aging products than ever before,” says Marianna Blyumin-Karasik, M.D., a dermatologist from Miama, “and the potent exfoliants in them can cause irritation. So more women are experiencing the symptoms of sensitivity.”

Lifestyle Factors to Help Sensitive Skin

Sensitive skin types can benefit from some lifestyle changes that may help protect your skin. First, if you have allergic reactions, check with your allergy doctor. A patch test may reveal exactly what ingredients you are allergic to, so you can avoid these in the future.

Other steps you can try to protect your skin include:

Protect

Think of sensitive skin as fragile skin—it needs protection always. Use hats, clothing, and safe sunscreen. Protect from the wind with scarves.

Detox

Not in your body, necessarily, though of course you can, but we’re talking here about your home. Get rid of the toxic elements as much as you can, as the more you cut back, the less likely your body (and skin) will be to react. Get rid of chemical and environmental irritants in your personal care items, laundry items, household cleaners, furniture, paint, etc.

Moisturize

Sensitive skin is typically dry, which means that it’s vulnerable to attack. Keep it moisturized always.

Always take your makeup off

Do not sleep in your makeup! Even the most natural products can become clogged in your pores and cause irritation. Use a gentle cleanser and then put on your moisturizing night cream so your skin has a chance to recover.

Be wary of bacteria

This means replacing your washcloth and pillowcase more often, and tossing out old makeup and cosmetic products. Wash your makeup brushes often and let them air dry.

Consider a shower filter

Many sources of city water may contain chlorine or other chemicals that can cause your skin to react. A shower filter can help cut down on your exposure to these chemicals.

Test

When you’re trying a new product, always test it on your wrist, arm, or behind the ear first before putting it on your face or more broadly on your body.

Avoid your triggers

As much as you can, avoid triggers like lanolin, harsh soaps, alcohols, chemicals, fragrances, and the like. Learn to read labels on your skin care products.

Use a humidifier

Unless you live in a humid climate, use a humidifier to help your skin stay moisturized.

Don’t be fooled

Any manufacturer of personal care products can put “hypo-allergenic” on their label. It doesn’t mean you will not have an allergic reaction to it, so always test it first.

Daily Routine for Sensitive Skin

With sensitive skin, the keys are “gentle” and “non-toxic.” Keep these two terms in mind whenever you’re shopping for new products, or thinking about trying home-based remedies.

Wash gently and naturally

Stay away from all harsh cleansers, particularly soaps and cleansers that have sulfates, alcohols, and preservatives in them. All of these can not only make your skin react, but will contribute to dryness, fine lines, and wrinkles. You need a gentle, natural formula that will clean while soothing and calming.

Try our Aloe-Herb Cleanser, which uses the gentle properties of aloe to soothe while herbal cleansers go to work cleaning dirt, oils and impurities. You can also try using straight coconut milk with cucumber juice and a little honey or tea tree oil. No matter what you use, if it leaves your skin feeling tight, try something else.

natural cleanser

Don’t tone—rebalance

Sensitive skin types should stay away from regular toner, as it’s usually drying, irritating, or harsh. Instead, what you need after cleansing is something that will help restore balance to your skin that cleansing disrupted.

Try our Neroli Toning Mist, which is soothing and gentle, yet balancing. You can also try cool green tea, or regular rosewater, which are both helpful for occasional redness.

Moisturize and calm

Like dry skin types, sensitive skin needs regular moisture. In addition to moisture, however, you need ingredients that will calm. So you’re looking for your moisturizer to hydrate and soothe.

If you try our Herbal Facial Oil for Sensitive Skin, specifically formulated for sensitive skin, you’ll get sensitive moisturization that is both calming and gentle on your skin, along with a good dose of protective antioxidants.

You can also try jojoba oil or aloe vera oil formulas, or look for calming moisturizers like chamomile, shea butter, propolis, and bisabolol.

sensitive skin

add to your weekly routine

In addition to your daily routine, take these steps every week for more glowing, hydrated skin:

Exfoliate with the utmost caution!

All skin needs exfoliation, but sensitive skin types can be further damaged by it if you’re not careful. Avoid harsh scrubs and choose natural exfoliators instead like those in our Ayurvedic Facial Scrub.

This product helps exfoliate while still moisturizing and soothing. Oatmeal and water can also be used. Try once or twice a week, depending on how your skin reacts. Avoid microdermabrasion and other harsh treatments, however.

DIY body scrub recipes

Nourishing mask

Sensitive skin needs nourishment even more than other skin types. Here again, the key is “soothing.” You want a mask that’s going to calm and balance. Our Coconut Honey Mask is great for this as well, but you can also try mixing plain yogurt with oatmeal and leaving on the skin 10-15 minutes, or mix heavy whipping cream with brewed tea and honey.

Gently Care

Sensitive skin ages just like other skins, and often shows fine line and wrinkles even more quickly. Try mixing strawberries with yogurt instead, and leave that on your skin for a few minutes. Strawberries have natural hydroxy acids. You can also try salicylic acid, as it’s more gentle than the other types.

Do you struggle with sensitive skin? How do you cope? Please share any tips you may have.

 

The following post Sensitive Skin: What It Is, How to Cope, and the Best Products for You was first published on Annmarie Skin Care.

3 Herbal Tea Recipes for Youthful Skin (By Skin Type)

Unexpected Uses for Tea

When you work with the skin, you quickly learn that most of what shows up is a response to internal or external factors.

The skin’s main function is to be a living, breathing barrier between our internal and external environments. It’s the last organ to receive nutrients from the bloodstream and our first line of defense for external pathogens — this means it’s really important to nourish ourselves effectively to make sure that our nutrients reach all the way out to our skin.

From the inside out

At Annmarie Skin Care, we do make skin care that supports your skin’s natural defenses, but that leaves the other half of the equation up to internal maintenance.

I’m constantly recommending that my clients, friends, and family drink herbal teas because it is the best and safest medicine for maintaining health over time. Consistent tea drinking gives your body what it needs in doses that it can handle.

Teas are a really wonderful way to boost your body’s hydration, and because we’re made of 65-80 percent water, the constituents that hot (and cold) water pulls out of the herbs are really absorbable for us.

Youthful Skin Tea Blends

The loveliest thing about herbs is how versatile they are. Most herbs have a myriad of actions associated with them, so it isn’t hard to come up with a tasty blend that does a lot of good in your body. We’re always looking for ways to keep our skin glowing and youthful and a good tea blend can offer us some really beautiful results!

When you’re creating an herbal tea blend (or any kind of herbal formula) you always want to look at what your goal is and what issues might be standing in the way of that goal. It might be obvious, but when the goal is ‘youthful skin’ you want to work to counter the causes of aging.

Reducing the Appearance of Aging

There’s no way to slow down time, so let’s think about aging in a different way. As we age our DNA is changed and damaged by natural wear and tear. We breathe oxygen to live, so we are literally oxidizing our bodies every time we take a breath.

Our cells are fed by glucose, so our body breaks down our nutrients into sugars. Though many of us consume too much sugar — and that’s something we can work on — glycation is a natural part of the living process.

Stress is also a natural part of our lives — without a bit of stress we would have a hard time accomplishing our goals. Over time, stress hormones and especially excess stress are considered to have a negative effect on us — yet again, it’s another part of aging.

The idea behind a youthful skin tea blend is to equip your body with tools to nourish the skin even though these processes are going on. Since we know the actions of herbs through knowledge that has been passed down through the ages and (very recently) through scientifically breaking down plants into their constituents, we’re able to directly reduce the look of aging on the skin.

But let’s go a little bit deeper and create some tasty, youthful skin teas based on skin type.

Youthful Skin Teas Based on Skin Type

When you’re making a tea for daily use, you want to work with gentle tonic herbs that will help bring your skin into balance rather than a tea blend that will push your skin in the opposite direction.

Additionally, I ascribe to the traditional way to drink tea — I suggest steeping tea 2-3 times before throwing out your herbs. This will make sure that you’re getting all of the nutrients out of your herbs (some take longer to be released), you’ll have more water in your body, and your blend will last much longer.

I suggest supporting your local herb store for your tea blend, but if there isn’t one close to you, Mountain Rose Herbs or Pacific Botanicals are great online retail stores for your herbs.

Youthful Skin Tea for Oily Skin

If you’re experiencing oily skin, you want to add herbs that will help balance out your skin. Cleansing and cooling herbs are helpful and great creating balance in the whole system.

Equal parts: Steep 2-3 times.

•     Lemon balm
•      Yarrow
•      Burdock root
•      Hibicus
•      Tulsi

Youthful Skin Tea for Dry Skin

What you’re experiencing on the outside of the body is really indicative to what’s happening internally. If you have dry skin externally, I always add juicy herbs to help support to the skin.

Equal parts: Steep 2-3 times

•      Marshmallow root
•      Alfalfa
•      Vervain
•      Rosehips
•      Ashwagandha

Keep it balanced! Youthful Skin Tea for Combination Skin

Combination skin is the most difficult to work with externally, but internal skin work is all about balance! We want to focus on nutrients and minerals to help feed the skin so that it can balance itself.

Equal parts: Steep 2-3 times

•      Dandelion root
•      Nettle leaf
•      Burdock root
•      Chamomile
•      Schizandra Berries

beauty blend…for all skin types!

We love tea so much at Annmarie Skin Care that we decided to make a blend ourselves. Our Beauty Blend is a heart hugging organic potion stocked with antioxidants, phytonutrients, bioflavonoids, and age-defying fruits.

We hijacked some of our favorite herbs from our skin care creations for this tea. Sea Buckthorn Berries, Horsetail, and Gogi Berries are just a few members of the dream team here, feeding your glow from the inside out!

But dont take our word for it—pick up a canister for yourself! Shop here.

Do you have a favorite herbal blend for your skin? Let us know below!

 

Sources:

Senescence – Damange-Based Theories of Aging

News Medical – What is Oxidative Stress?

The following post 3 Herbal Tea Recipes for Youthful Skin (By Skin Type) was first published on Annmarie Skin Care.

7 Oils You Shouldn’t Use if You Have Clogged Pores

shea

Just because something is natural doesn’t mean it’s good for your skin.

Natural ingredients are often healthier for your skin than synthetic, but not all natural ingredients work for all skin types. Those with sensitive skin still need to be selective about the products they use. If your skin is prone to excess oil, you want to stay away from things that are likely to clog your pores, and that includes some natural ingredients.

choosing oils based on your skin type

The thing is that some oils are great for oily skin, because of their unique ratio of essential fatty acids, while others, for the same reason, are occlusive and can block pores. This is why grapeseed oil, which is naturally high in linoleic acid, is helpful for those with clogged pores and oily skin.

use caution with oily skin

What this means that as we look at natural ingredients in skin care—which are mostly oils and butters—we have to consider how the essential fatty acids in these oils will interact and potentially affect oily skin. (Read more about essential fatty acids here.)

Here are 7 oils you shouldn’t use if you have oily skin and clogged pores:

oils for acne prone skin

1. Unfractionated coconut oil

We talked about the difference between fractionated and unfractionated coconut oil in this post. Briefly, fractionated coconut oil is a form of the oil that has had the long-chain fatty acids removed via hydrolysis and steam distillation. Just this one change makes the oil liquid at room temperature and extends the product’s shelf life. It also makes it a lighter oil that is less likely to clog pores. Heavier oils rich in fatty acids are wonderful moisturizers, but they can be irritating for sensitive skin.

2. Cocoa butter

This is another very moisturizing ingredient that has skin-protecting antioxidants as well as plumping fatty acids, but it can be too occlusive for oily skin, especially on the face.

oils for acne prone skin

3. Sesame oil

This one is more balanced then some, with only slightly more oleic than linoleic, but it’s one to watch out for. If you want to use it, try on a small area first, to see how it affects you. Even if you can’t use it on your face, you may be fine enjoying it on the rest of the body.

4. Wheat germ oil

On the natural ingredient list, wheat germ oil is often listed as one of the most comedogenic. If you have clogged pores, it’s probably best to avoid this oil and restrict its use for hair care.

5. Shea butter

This butter, though super beneficial for dry skin, may be too much for oily prone skin because of its high level of oleic fatty acids. There are varying levels of shea butter in different products, and the formula matters too—what the shea butter is mixed in with. You don’t necessarily need to stay away from this one, but just be cautious when you see it, and watch your skin carefully for any reactions.

oils for acne prone skin

6. Sea buckthorn oil

This oils is full of protective antioxidants, but it’s low in linoleic acid, too. It’s not particularly high in oleic, so if you combine it with some other oils that are higher in linoleic acid, it’s likely you could still enjoy the anti-aging benefits without having to worry about clogged pores.

7. Other oils

Several oils are high in “oleic” fatty acids, which are believed to cause more clogged pores than those high in “linoleic” fatty acids. Since oily skin is believed to be low in linoleic fatty acids, oils with more of these typically work well, while those with more “oleic” acid may cause more issues. Based on this theory, some to avoid include olive, avocado, apricot kernel, and sweet almond oil.

rosehip

Try these!

Meanwhile, some oils that are great for oily skin include grapeseed, rosehip, evening primrose, hemp, and pumpkin seed oil.

Which oils do you find work for your skin type? Let us know in the comments below!

 

The following post 7 Oils You Shouldn’t Use if You Have Clogged Pores was first published on Annmarie Skin Care.

Sensitive Skin: What It Is, How to Cope, and the Best Products for You

sensitive skin

We’ve been talking about skin types here the last few weeks—dry, oily, and combination. But this week, we’re talking about a type that can co-exist with any of these. In other words, you can have combination skin, and also have sensitive skin. Dry skin types are the ones who are most often plagued with sensitivity as well, but combinations may have it too. It’s more rare in oily skin.

In the world of skin care, being “sensitive” doesn’t mean that you’re feelings are easily hurt. Instead, it means that your skin can be easily affected, and has a definite set of characteristics that require special care.

If you think you may fall in the sensitive realm, read on.

What is Sensitive Skin?

Sensitive skin is easily “bothered” by things. Sun exposure, wind, heat and cold, chemicals in products, and other similar factors can all cause this skin type to react. The type of reaction may vary, but the key point is that the skin is often reacting to something.

What Causes Sensitive Skin?

There are a number of possible causes. You may have been born with sensitive skin. Maybe your mom or dad had it, or one of your grandparents. Either way, it’s been that way since you can remember, and you’re stuck.

There are other things, however, that can actually cause your skin to become more sensitive. These include:

Allergies—if you are allergic to certain things, your skin may react sensitively to them

Dry skin—dry skin types are often sensitive as well, because of the thinner outer layer

Excessive exposure to environmental factors, such as the sun, wind, or harsh chemical irritants

If you have any of the above skin conditions, you qualify as a sensitive skin type.

skin care concern

Specific Problems in Sensitive Skin Types

Sensitive skins usually notice these types of problems:

•     Occasional redness
•     Sunburns and windburns easily
•     Occasional blotchiness
•     Dryness
•     Oily skin
•     Clogged pores
•     Tight skin

Most Sensitive Skins Have Triggers

If you have sensitive skin, you may already know some of the “triggers” that create reactions on your skin. There are some common, ones, however, that you may not be aware of. Some well known triggers that can make sensitive skin react include:

•     Temperature changes
•     Chemical and/or synthetic fragrances
•     Formaldehyde
(and formaldehyde releasing preservatives like urea, quaternium-15, and DMDM hydantoin)
•     Dyes
•     Cosmetics and soaps
•     Preservatives
•     Propylene glycol and ethanol
•     Fragrances (the #1 allergen and irritant in cosmetics)
•     Bismuth oxychloride and mica (light-refracting ingredients found in makeup)
•     Hormonal imbalances
•     Lanolin
•     Rubber latex
•     4-tert-butylphenol in cosmetics (lip liners), plastics, and lacquers
•     Chemicals used in pesticides and herbicides
•     Menthol and peppermint
•     Gold and silver metals

Some people who have allergies to natural trees and grasses, such as ragweed, can also develop allergies to essential oils like chamomile and calendula, since these are cross-reactive ragweed allergens.

check your labels!

Others can gradually become sensitized to certain skin care products that have formaldehyde, particularly after using them for awhile. This is why it’s important to always be careful about the ingredients in your product, as some harsh chemicals and preservatives can sometimes create skin sensitivity over time as you use them.

“Women are using more anti-aging products than ever before,” says Marianna Blyumin-Karasik, M.D., a dermatologist from Miama, “and the potent exfoliants in them can cause irritation. So more women are experiencing the symptoms of sensitivity.”

Lifestyle Factors to Help Sensitive Skin

Sensitive skin types can benefit from some lifestyle changes that may help protect your skin. First, if you have allergic reactions, check with your allergy doctor. A patch test may reveal exactly what ingredients you are allergic to, so you can avoid these in the future.

Other steps you can try to protect your skin include:

Protect

Think of sensitive skin as fragile skin—it needs protection always. Use hats, clothing, and safe sunscreen. Protect from the wind with scarves.

Detox

Not in your body, necessarily, though of course you can, but we’re talking here about your home. Get rid of the toxic elements as much as you can, as the more you cut back, the less likely your body (and skin) will be to react. Get rid of chemical and environmental irritants in your personal care items, laundry items, household cleaners, furniture, paint, etc.

Moisturize

Sensitive skin is typically dry, which means that it’s vulnerable to attack. Keep it moisturized always.

Always take your makeup off

Do not sleep in your makeup! Even the most natural products can become clogged in your pores and cause irritation. Use a gentle cleanser and then put on your moisturizing night cream so your skin has a chance to recover.

Be wary of bacteria

This means replacing your washcloth and pillowcase more often, and tossing out old makeup and cosmetic products. Wash your makeup brushes often and let them air dry.

Consider a shower filter

Many sources of city water may contain chlorine or other chemicals that can cause your skin to react. A shower filter can help cut down on your exposure to these chemicals.

Test

When you’re trying a new product, always test it on your wrist, arm, or behind the ear first before putting it on your face or more broadly on your body.

Avoid your triggers

As much as you can, avoid triggers like lanolin, harsh soaps, alcohols, chemicals, fragrances, and the like. Learn to read labels on your skin care products.

Use a humidifier

Unless you live in a humid climate, use a humidifier to help your skin stay moisturized.

Don’t be fooled

Any manufacturer of personal care products can put “hypo-allergenic” on their label. It doesn’t mean you will not have an allergic reaction to it, so always test it first.

Daily Routine for Sensitive Skin

With sensitive skin, the keys are “gentle” and “non-toxic.” Keep these two terms in mind whenever you’re shopping for new products, or thinking about trying home-based remedies.

Wash gently and naturally

Stay away from all harsh cleansers, particularly soaps and cleansers that have sulfates, alcohols, and preservatives in them. All of these can not only make your skin react, but will contribute to dryness, fine lines, and wrinkles. You need a gentle, natural formula that will clean while soothing and calming.

Try our Aloe-Herb Cleanser, which uses the gentle properties of aloe to soothe while herbal cleansers go to work cleaning dirt, oils and impurities. You can also try using straight coconut milk with cucumber juice and a little honey or tea tree oil. No matter what you use, if it leaves your skin feeling tight, try something else.

natural cleanser

Don’t tone—rebalance

Sensitive skin types should stay away from regular toner, as it’s usually drying, irritating, or harsh. Instead, what you need after cleansing is something that will help restore balance to your skin that cleansing disrupted.

Try our Neroli Toning Mist, which is soothing and gentle, yet balancing. You can also try cool green tea, or regular rosewater, which are both helpful for occasional redness.

Moisturize and calm

Like dry skin types, sensitive skin needs regular moisture. In addition to moisture, however, you need ingredients that will calm. So you’re looking for your moisturizer to hydrate and soothe.

If you try our Herbal Facial Oil for Sensitive Skin, specifically formulated for sensitive skin, you’ll get sensitive moisturization that is both calming and gentle on your skin, along with a good dose of protective antioxidants.

You can also try jojoba oil or aloe vera oil formulas, or look for calming moisturizers like chamomile, shea butter, propolis, and bisabolol.

sensitive skin

add to your weekly routine

In addition to your daily routine, take these steps every week for more glowing, hydrated skin:

Exfoliate with the utmost caution!

All skin needs exfoliation, but sensitive skin types can be further damaged by it if you’re not careful. Avoid harsh scrubs and choose natural exfoliators instead like those in our Ayurvedic Facial Scrub.

This product helps exfoliate while still moisturizing and soothing. Oatmeal and water can also be used. Try once or twice a week, depending on how your skin reacts. Avoid microdermabrasion and other harsh treatments, however.

DIY body scrub recipes

Nourishing mask

Sensitive skin needs nourishment even more than other skin types. Here again, the key is “soothing.” You want a mask that’s going to calm and balance. Our Coconut Honey Mask is great for this as well, but you can also try mixing plain yogurt with oatmeal and leaving on the skin 10-15 minutes, or mix heavy whipping cream with brewed tea and honey.

Gently Care

Sensitive skin ages just like other skins, and often shows fine line and wrinkles even more quickly. Try mixing strawberries with yogurt instead, and leave that on your skin for a few minutes. Strawberries have natural hydroxy acids. You can also try salicylic acid, as it’s more gentle than the other types.

Do you struggle with sensitive skin? How do you cope? Please share any tips you may have.

 

The following post Sensitive Skin: What It Is, How to Cope, and the Best Products for You was first published on Annmarie Skin Care.

5 Little Known Natural Skin Care Ingredients That Will be Mainstream in 5 Years

little known skin care ingredients

I still remember my shocking discovery in the first year of my career in esthetics. It felt like a bubble popped when I realized popular opinion believed organic, natural or holistic skin care was nothing more than a hippie home remedy concept. Even some of the students studying beside me at the Aveda Institute needed to be convinced the products would effectively create changes in the skin. Crazy, right?

This was in 2008, so recent you have to remember this too. Yes? Or has it become so mainstream you’ve forgotten? Isn’t that an interesting prospect — how quickly what is “normal” changes? Think about Kale: it was a garnish no one ever ate, most often seen at budget buffets! Kale has come a long way, and so has the belief and research behind natural skin care ingredients.

A Switch to Organic

Leap forward, 5 years into my career as a holistic esthetician, I was overjoyed to see the organic movement really begin to take off, right around 2013. Here we are another 5 years later, 2018.

What was once seen as hippie home remedies are sought after by the masses, fill grocery store shelves, celebrities spearhead organic brands and clinics struggle to keep up with the research and development demands of the natural skin care market.

5 little known skin care ingredients that will hit the mainstream soon

The public has been educated and toxin-filled products are no longer acceptable. With a clear focus on organic, the natural skin care product market is constantly researching the latest ingredient that will set a brand apart.

Here are 5 of the hottest ingredients right now that will be mainstream in 5 years — or less!

1. HEMP OIL (CBD)

Hemp was once primarily known as a textile ingredient that was a conscious alternative to cotton. The hemp plant has evolved. No longer only known as a textile or a part of an illegal substance, hemp oil has been successfully extracted with no psychoactive elements. Hemp Oil has been proven to be rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids which help regenerate skin’s protective outer layer.

Additionally, the component CBD has been extracted and approved for medical use to effectively treat patients suffering from seizures. The topical skin care benefits of this wonder ingredient were not far behind and science is still researching a compiling data to support a numerous list of benefits. Read the beginners guide to CBD to get the full scoop.

Hemp for your skin

The latest findings show that Hemp oil and CBD offer incredible skin care benefits. CBD is an antioxidant even more powerful than Vitamin C, E, A, or Omega 3 fatty acids. Researchers have even begun looking into using cannabinoids (CBD and other components within the hemp plant) on patients with psoriasis.

Acne / Dry Skin

CBD can inhibit the lipid production in skin cells, making it an effective preventative for acne. However, manipulating this system can also be used to increase output of sebum as well to prevent dry skin issues.

Want to try Hemp Seed Oil?

Regenerate the skin’s protective outer layer with hemp seed oil, get your omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids fix and feed your skin numerous other skin-saving ingredients within the luxurious, herb-infused Anti-Aging Oil.

little known skin care ingredients

2. TREMELLA MUSHROOM

Tremella is a genus of fungi in the family Tremellacea that has water-retention capabilities supposedly superior to hyaluronic acid which holds more than 1,000 times its weight in water.

The ultimate hydrator

This makes Tremella the ultimate hydration ingredient for the skin. This is the first hydration ingredient found to rival Hyaluronic Acid, a known anti-aging buzzword in the industry. Not only is the jelly-like fungi a water binding ingredient, it is also source of vitamin D, a free radical scavenger.

It’s been shown to lighten the appearance of skin, and it’s moisturizing effects make them ideal candidates for cosmetics products.

Want to try Tremella? Find this magical ingredient in the Probiotic Skin Serum and learn more about it here.

little known skin care ingredients

3. KAKADU PLUM

What exactly is Kakadu plum? It is a native Australian fruit that’s rich in vitamin C. Although it is called a plum, it is actually more closely related to the almond.

Vitamin C Powerhouse

Data from Food Chemistry and the U.S. Department of Agriculture suggests that Kakadu plum contains 55 times more vitamin C than a Florida orange. Other data has surfaced that shows Kakadu Plums can contain 3000mg of Vitamin C per 100g of fruit. This is more than fifty times the amount found in oranges! This magical fruit is a powerhouse of Vitamin C which is a known antioxidant, and brightens the appearance of skin.

In addition to Vitamin C, this little fruit contains Vitamin E, a phytochemical called gallic acid that calms the skin’s apperance and the minerals zinc, iron, lutein and folate, all of which are essential for a healthy complexion.

Want to try Kakadu Plum?

You can find this magical ingredient within the Wild Fruit Serum, your powerful anti-aging elixir of choice.

little known skin care ingredients

4. PLANT STEM CELLS

While stem cells aren’t exactly new to skin care, expect plant stem cells (a vegan alternative) to set the skin care industry ablaze. Restrictions on the use of animals and humans in cosmetics have turned interest toward plants. Similar to animals, the stem cells in plants have properties that help stimulate and regenerate plants after injury.

how do they work?

Animal stem cells are specialized to a specific body competent (example: liver stem cells build the liver but do not build the heart). In contrast, plant stem cells are more adaptable and able to establish stem cell niches in new locations building different parts of the plant. This difference is what makes plant cells application for human skin a real possibility.

One company, XtemCell, found in clinical testing proof that the active cells used in XtemCell’s products are easily absorbed into the outermost cells of the epidermis, allowing almost instantaneous nutrient absorption and an increase in the skin’s level of proteins to protect the skin from further sun and aging damage when applied.

Try plant stem cells!

These can be found in the Citrus Stem Cell Serum – an elixir of the most nutritive and cutting edge-ingredients.

gut health

5. PROBIOTICS

No longer just for your gut, probiotics have been sneaking up in the skincare market as an addition to take note of and will soon be an ingredient our skin care won’t be able to live without.

probiotics for my skin?

So, how do probiotics work on the skin? It’s important to know that the skin’s surface is a multifaceted environment, almost like a city of living things populating and working in every part of it.

Even though the top layers of skin are dead, there’s an abundant population of microflora thriving there, affecting skin’s appearance, youthful or otherwise, every day. This is skin’s microbiome, and keeping it in balance is among the more fascinating parts of how probiotics for skin work.

What to look for from probiotics?

Probiotics in skincare products demand careful formulation due to their inherent instability; they’re very fragile and deteriorate easily. This means no jar packaging (light and air cause them to break down faster) and buying products only from brands that have a good understanding of how probiotics work is imperative.

Knowing which formulary techniques are necessary is essential to getting the best possible results when using probiotics on the skin.

Try probiotics!

If you’re interested in giving probiotics a try you can find them in the Probiotic Serum – this unique blend also have the above mentioned Tremella so you can get double the cutting edge ingredient fix in one product.

What else?

Some additional ingredients that met the top 10 but weren’t listed here are Turmeric and Charcoal (not chosen simply because I feel the above 5 are more likely to stick around the next 5 years).

Note: this article was NOT written as a love affair with the Annmarie brand or to promote certain products of their brand. I was even certain that none of the products had Hemp Oil or Kakadu Plum in them when I created this list! 

Bokhara Lashi
Wellness Specialist, Embody Zen

Artist, Moss Art Studio

Think I missed a skin care ingredient that will be mainstream in 5 years? Let me know in a comment below!

 

References:
9 Weird Beauty Ingredients You’re Going to See Everywhere In 2018
HOW CBD HEMP OIL WORKS FOR SKIN CARE
Cannabidiol and (−)Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol are neuroprotective antioxidants
Cannabidiol exerts sebostatic and antiinflammatory effects on human sebocytes.
Efficacy of dietary hempseed oil in patients with atopic dermatitis.
Cannabis for Refractory Psoriasis-High Hopes for a Novel Treatment and a Literature Review.
Tremella – A natural alternative to sodium hyaluronate
Mushroom Cosmetics: The Present and Future
Is Kakadu Plum the Newest Must-Have Beauty Ingredient?
Plant stem cells in cosmetics: current trends and future directions
Everything You Need to Know About Probiotics and Skin

 

The following post 5 Little Known Natural Skin Care Ingredients That Will be Mainstream in 5 Years was first published on Annmarie Skin Care.